Fitness enthusiasts need to have a plan

Fitness enthusiasts need to have a plan

Athletic trainer and strongman Andrew Durniat juggles 70-pound kettlebells during a workout.

Athletic trainer and strongman Andrew Durniat juggles 70-pound kettlebells during a workout.

A person wouldn’t embark on a trip without an idea of where they’re going. They should have a road map, or maybe more likely a GPS programed these days, if there is any uncertainty.
Renowned athletic trainer and strongman Andrew Durniat of Wooster, Ohio, has a simple question he asks new clients.
“Why are you here?” Durniat asks people who walk through the Durniat Strength door in Wooster.
“A key to improved fitness is defining a goal,” Durniat explained. “It is almost impossible to succeed unless you know where you wish to go. Getting in better shape” means a lot of different things to different people. Do you want to lose 10 pounds of body fat — not just weight, FAT — there is a difference?
“Do you want to be able to play pick-up basketball again or play better? How about softball or some other recreational sport? Do you want to build strength, real strength? These are all questions you should ask yourself. Only once the “why are you here” question is answered can you reasonably begin.”
Durniat believes in free-weight based training and he’s helped athletes in many sports improve their performance, along with average every-day citizens trying to feel more fit. The certified strength and conditioning coach and champion strongman focuses on teaching people the right way to lift weights before increasing the weights.
“Lifting and training is as much a skill that promotes balance and mobility as it is about physiological changes,” Durniat said. “Squatting is a fundamental movement, but it is one that we must be taught again.
“Most individuals don’t need extra weight and we have a systematic way of teaching — using boxes, then a goblet squat and deadlifts, before eventually progressing to a barbell.”
I really like the way Durniat stresses to compete against yourself and not the guy or girl nearby.
“You want to experience smooth consistent progress with your training,” Durniat said. “It does you no good to go ‘do what I use to do in high school’ or mimic the guy next to you. He may be one of our 500-plus pound squatters, or an Olympic athlete who trains here. Start small and progress, life is a long-term goal, not a 12-week program.”
Performing regular strength training exercises can help people not only get stronger, but improve overall health, mobility and balance. Many of Durniat’s clients even experience reduced back pain because their bodies are again functioning properly.
“Start at a manageable pace — consistency is key,” said Durniat, who can reached via email at durniatstrength@gmail.com or by phone at 949-230-6945. “Set small realistic goals and hold yourself accountable. Write everything you do down. When you feel you haven’t accomplished anything, look back and see just how far you have come, you will be amazed.
“A gym and training is for everyone. Take the first steps to a better you. All you have to lose is your weakness.”

At Home Fitness consultant Aaron Dorksen’s blog deals with a variety of fitness topics, ranging from workout tips, motivational ideas and feature stories on how exercise impacts people’s lives. E-mail him with comments, questions or ideas for future blogs at aaron@athomefitness.com

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